fuckyeahanarchopunk

militantweasel:

On a lighter note, here are some pictures from us crashing the corporate Pride parade with a Pink Bloc that had fun without paying the ridiculously high registration fee. We won’t pay, to be queer! The Pink Bloc originated at May Day and its participants have created a range of creative forms of queer resistance, from the organization Glitur, to the “Drag Out Capitalism” drag show during Pride weekend.  A vibrant, radical queer movement is emerging in Seattle, and the police are not going to stop us.

http://blackorchidcollective.wordpress.com/2012/06/28/pride/

america-wakiewakie

america-wakiewakie:

[Please Watch/Listen & Signal Boost] Man Arrested While Picking Up His Kids: ‘The Problem Is I’m Black’ | The Atlantic 

If you’ve never experienced arbitrary harassment or brutality at the hands of a police officer, or seen law enforcement act in a way that defies credulity and common sense, it can be hard to believe people who tell stories of inexplicable persecution. As I noted in “Video Killed Trust in Police Officers,” the dawn of cheap recording technology has exposed an ugly side of U.S. law enforcement that a majority of people in middle-class neighborhoods never would’ve seen otherwise. 

Today, what’s most disheartening isn’t that so many Americans still reflexively doubt stories of police harassment, as awful as it is whenever real victims are ignored. What vexes me most is police officers caught acting badly on camera who suffer no consequences and are defended by the police agencies that employ them. 

The latest example of abusive, atrocious police work posted to YouTube comes from St. Paul, Minnesota, where a black father, Chris Lollie, reportedly got off work at Cossetta, an upscale Italian eatery, walked to the downtown building that houses New Horizon Academy, where he was to to pick up his kids, and killed the ten minutes until they’d be released sitting down on a chair in a skyway between buildings. Those details come from the Minneapolis City Pageswhere commenters describe the area he inhabited as a public thoroughfare between commercial buildings. If you’re 27 and black with dreadlocks, sometimes you’re waiting to pick up your kids and someone calls the cops to get rid of you. The police report indicates a call about “an uncooperative male refusing to leave,” which makes it sound as though someone else first asked him to vacate where he was; another press report says that he was sitting in a chair in a public area when a security guard approached and told him to leave as the area was reserved for employees. The Minnesota Star Tribune visited the seating area and reported that ”there was no signage in the area indicating that it was reserved for employees.” 

So a man waiting to pick up his kids from school sits for a few minutes in a seating area where he reasonably thinks he has a right to be, private security asks him to leave, he thinks they’re harassing him because he’s black, and they call police. This is where the video begins, and that conflict is already over. The man is walking away from it and toward the nearby school where he is to pick up his kids.

So problem solved? It could have been.

Instead, this happened: [See Video Above]

What the video shows is a man who is politely but firmly telling a police officer that she has no right to ask him for identification, because he hasn’t done anything wrong or broken any laws, and is present in the building to pick up his kids. “What’s the problem?” he asks at one point, and answers his own question: “The problem is I’m black.” We can’t see inside the heads of the people who called the police or the officers who showed up, but that seems like a highly relevant factor–it certainly wasn’t unreasonable for him to reach that conclusion. 

His story about getting his kids wasn’t merely plausible, given the man’s age and the fact that there was a school right there–it was a story the female police officer shown at the beginning of the video or the male officer shown later could easily confirm. 

Lollie is also absolutely correct that no law required him to show an ID to police officers. As Flex Your Rights explains, “Police can never compel you to identify yourself without reasonable suspicion to believe you’re involved in illegal activity,” and while 24 states have passed “stop and identify” statutes “requiring citizens to reveal their identity when officers have reasonable suspicion to believe criminal activity may be taking place,” Minnesota isn’t one of those states.

糞野郎

america-wakiewakie

america-wakiewakie:

[Please Watch/Listen & Signal Boost] Man Arrested While Picking Up His Kids: ‘The Problem Is I’m Black’ | The Atlantic 

If you’ve never experienced arbitrary harassment or brutality at the hands of a police officer, or seen law enforcement act in a way that defies credulity and common sense, it can be hard to believe people who tell stories of inexplicable persecution. As I noted in “Video Killed Trust in Police Officers,” the dawn of cheap recording technology has exposed an ugly side of U.S. law enforcement that a majority of people in middle-class neighborhoods never would’ve seen otherwise. 

Today, what’s most disheartening isn’t that so many Americans still reflexively doubt stories of police harassment, as awful as it is whenever real victims are ignored. What vexes me most is police officers caught acting badly on camera who suffer no consequences and are defended by the police agencies that employ them. 

The latest example of abusive, atrocious police work posted to YouTube comes from St. Paul, Minnesota, where a black father, Chris Lollie, reportedly got off work at Cossetta, an upscale Italian eatery, walked to the downtown building that houses New Horizon Academy, where he was to to pick up his kids, and killed the ten minutes until they’d be released sitting down on a chair in a skyway between buildings. Those details come from the Minneapolis City Pageswhere commenters describe the area he inhabited as a public thoroughfare between commercial buildings. If you’re 27 and black with dreadlocks, sometimes you’re waiting to pick up your kids and someone calls the cops to get rid of you. The police report indicates a call about “an uncooperative male refusing to leave,” which makes it sound as though someone else first asked him to vacate where he was; another press report says that he was sitting in a chair in a public area when a security guard approached and told him to leave as the area was reserved for employees. The Minnesota Star Tribune visited the seating area and reported that ”there was no signage in the area indicating that it was reserved for employees.” 

So a man waiting to pick up his kids from school sits for a few minutes in a seating area where he reasonably thinks he has a right to be, private security asks him to leave, he thinks they’re harassing him because he’s black, and they call police. This is where the video begins, and that conflict is already over. The man is walking away from it and toward the nearby school where he is to pick up his kids.

So problem solved? It could have been.

Instead, this happened: [See Video Above]

What the video shows is a man who is politely but firmly telling a police officer that she has no right to ask him for identification, because he hasn’t done anything wrong or broken any laws, and is present in the building to pick up his kids. “What’s the problem?” he asks at one point, and answers his own question: “The problem is I’m black.” We can’t see inside the heads of the people who called the police or the officers who showed up, but that seems like a highly relevant factor–it certainly wasn’t unreasonable for him to reach that conclusion. 

His story about getting his kids wasn’t merely plausible, given the man’s age and the fact that there was a school right there–it was a story the female police officer shown at the beginning of the video or the male officer shown later could easily confirm. 

Lollie is also absolutely correct that no law required him to show an ID to police officers. As Flex Your Rights explains, “Police can never compel you to identify yourself without reasonable suspicion to believe you’re involved in illegal activity,” and while 24 states have passed “stop and identify” statutes “requiring citizens to reveal their identity when officers have reasonable suspicion to believe criminal activity may be taking place,” Minnesota isn’t one of those states.

maiqilai

magictransistor:

Pages from an Illuminated Gospel. Ethiopia, Highland Region. 1300s.

This illuminated manuscript of the Four Gospels was created in the late fourteenth to early fifteenth century at an Ethiopian monastic center. Its full-page paintings on vellum depict New Testament scenes from the life of Christ and portraits of the evangelists. The text is in Ge’ez, the classical Ethiopian language. Typical of Ethiopian painting, the imagery is two-dimensional and linear. Heads are seen frontally; bodies are often in profile. The artist abbreviated the facial features and treated the human form as a columnar mass, articulated in bold black and red lines.

In the fourth century A.D., the Ethiopian king Ezana converted to Christianity. Christianity became the official religion of the state whose legacy endured in various forms until the twentieth century. Around the time this manuscript was made, Ethiopia’s Christian kingdom expanded its influence. Monastic centers became increasingly important outposts of state power. They were also the chief sites of Christian art production. During the sixteenth century, Islamic incursions devastated the region, and most Christian Ethiopian art that predates the seventeenth century was destroyed. This illuminated gospel is a rare survival. -Met

謝謝的!非常的!

maiqilai

magictransistor:

Pages from an Illuminated Gospel. Ethiopia, Highland Region. 1300s.

This illuminated manuscript of the Four Gospels was created in the late fourteenth to early fifteenth century at an Ethiopian monastic center. Its full-page paintings on vellum depict New Testament scenes from the life of Christ and portraits of the evangelists. The text is in Ge’ez, the classical Ethiopian language. Typical of Ethiopian painting, the imagery is two-dimensional and linear. Heads are seen frontally; bodies are often in profile. The artist abbreviated the facial features and treated the human form as a columnar mass, articulated in bold black and red lines.

In the fourth century A.D., the Ethiopian king Ezana converted to Christianity. Christianity became the official religion of the state whose legacy endured in various forms until the twentieth century. Around the time this manuscript was made, Ethiopia’s Christian kingdom expanded its influence. Monastic centers became increasingly important outposts of state power. They were also the chief sites of Christian art production. During the sixteenth century, Islamic incursions devastated the region, and most Christian Ethiopian art that predates the seventeenth century was destroyed. This illuminated gospel is a rare survival. -Met

bobsavage
boomsticks-and-firewater:

america-wakiewakie:

cool-cool-breeze:

america-wakiewakie:

cool-cool-breeze:

Luckily this will never happen. Too many people respect civil society.

Because this society is so incredibly civil? Here’s what you meant to say:
"Luckily this will never happen. Too many people benefit from (and fear) normalized violence."

I responded to an anon about this and you should check it out. I don’t support normalized violence, but Marxism does reject necessary state and market institutions, it won’t work. I have a master’s degree in public administration, and looking at Marxism through than lens exposes its obvious follies

Feel free to link me to it. You cannot have your cake and eat it too. You cannot say you do not support normalized violence and be statist or capitalist. In contemporary history you would be hard pressed to find a more fitting example of normalized violence than the state, especially in conjunction with the institutions of capitalism. 
Your masters degree doesn’t mean anything to me, nor should it to anybody else. Degrees are mechanisms of a classist society which serve to alienate workers from each other by offering specialization only to those on the hierarchy most able to pay for it, or willing to go into servitude. 
And if you do your due diligence, Marxism is not all that complicated. At its core it is as simple as workers’ emancipation through the self-organization and utilization of the means of production. Cooperation is the bedrock of human evolution. People make it complicated because, as usual, they have a vested interest in the status quo.  

A vested interest like defending the State, an institution you’re most qualified to work for…

boomsticks-and-firewater:

america-wakiewakie:

cool-cool-breeze:

america-wakiewakie:

cool-cool-breeze:

Luckily this will never happen. Too many people respect civil society.

Because this society is so incredibly civil? Here’s what you meant to say:

"Luckily this will never happen. Too many people benefit from (and fear) normalized violence."

I responded to an anon about this and you should check it out. I don’t support normalized violence, but Marxism does reject necessary state and market institutions, it won’t work. I have a master’s degree in public administration, and looking at Marxism through than lens exposes its obvious follies

Feel free to link me to it. You cannot have your cake and eat it too. You cannot say you do not support normalized violence and be statist or capitalist. In contemporary history you would be hard pressed to find a more fitting example of normalized violence than the state, especially in conjunction with the institutions of capitalism. 

Your masters degree doesn’t mean anything to me, nor should it to anybody else. Degrees are mechanisms of a classist society which serve to alienate workers from each other by offering specialization only to those on the hierarchy most able to pay for it, or willing to go into servitude. 

And if you do your due diligence, Marxism is not all that complicated. At its core it is as simple as workers’ emancipation through the self-organization and utilization of the means of production. Cooperation is the bedrock of human evolution. People make it complicated because, as usual, they have a vested interest in the status quo.  

A vested interest like defending the State, an institution you’re most qualified to work for…